Thinking about frames.

A while ago I read a comment in one of the blogs I follow, that the majority of the textiles, in an exhibition the writer had visited, were not framed, but just ‘pinned to the wall’. This resonated with me because I have always had reservations about framing textile pieces. Partly because it’s expensive and I’m a cheapskate, but more because I think framing rarely does textiles justice. Apart from the problem of reflections, so often the box and the glazing disguise and obscure the tactility and 3D-ness of the textiles. I quite like the technique of attaching them to a box frame, but then you are restricted by the sizes of box frames which are available.

This morning we visited one our favourite galleries with rather nice coffee shops attached. The exhibition included several felt pieces, most of which were framed. Although reflections weren’t a problem in this gallery, I still thought that the few which weren’t framed looked more interesting: the haptic appeal of the felt was more evident, and those pieces didn’t seem confined, as the framed ones did.

I also remembered a tutorial discussion, about framing textiles, with a (non textile) tutor at university. I didn’t take much notice of it at the time, because if you are making giant gloves, you don’t even consider framing them. But one of the questions he raised was whether people who work in textiles frame their work because, traditionally, pictures are framed – and pictures are, in some people’s minds, ‘real art’. So by framing a textile piece we may be trying to position it in the that context.

Thinking back, none of my colleagues in the textile group at university did frame their degree show work – and I don’t think any of the painters did either. And in the gallery this morning, I think the only work which was framed, apart from the textiles, were prints of water colours by Prince Charles, and drawings by Queen Victoria. Make of that what you will. 

So now I’m thinking about revisiting my ‘Year of Stitches’ pieces, and considering what I might need to do to them if they were to be displayed ‘pinned to the wall’ – assuming I found a gallery which would let me do that!

It seemed like a good idea at the time.

This is a sampler for Year of Stitches, inspired by Dawn Thorne’s book, Transparency in Textiles. (The fact that it didn’t work is my fault, not hers!) She suggests layering strips of sheer fabric and joining them with running stitch, which I did. I mounted them on Aquabond first, which made it easier to manage. So for so good. 

Then I decided to add some prints on acetate, which meant washing out the Aquabond before I started, because water and prints on acetate don’t mix. This was not such a good idea. The base fabric distorted when I washed it, the acetates were slippery and difficult to sew, and the thinner areas tended to go into holes which distorted the stitching. I should have stuck with Ms Thorne’s suggestion of adding appliquéd sheers. 

Still, it was a learning experience.

The best thing I’ve done all week was this, which was a quicky for Make Something Every Day. The prompt was to use coffee in some form. I had some coffee stained paper, so as I’ve been playing around with ideas inspired by hawthorn blossom, and have a flower shaped punch, I decided to punch out some coffee coloured flowers, stick them on some paper, and call it done. (OK, they’re not much like hawthorn flowers, but I was cutting corners.) 

But then I found this bit of stencilled paper that’s been hanging around for years, and the whole thing got a bit more elaborate. If I have still got the stencil, there might be an embroidery in it…

A Perfect Day

64 Million Artists: Creative Challenges for Dementia Awareness Week

1. A self portrait.


2. A perfect day

The right companion.

No alarm clock.

Spring sunshine.

A leisurely breakfast.

A short drive to somewhere peaceful. 

A walk beside water.

A light, tasty lunch.

An interesting art exhibition before a hassle free drive home.

A pleasant supper, and a glass of something white.

 A good book and good music.

An early bed and a good night’s sleep.

Don’t believe all you read on the internet.

I read somewhere that you can use OHPs for sun printing – print a design on them, layer them over fabric painted with silk paints, leave them somewhere warm and come back to find the design printed on the fabric.


As you can see, it doesn’t work.

I did have doubts about whether it would.  Sun printing works by evaporation, and I suspected the liquid wouldn’t evaporate under a sheet of plastic, whether it was printed or not., only round the edges. I should have trusted my instinct. It would probably work if I cut stencils from the OHPs, so I may try again later. It does prove, though, that it’s warmth that makes the print, not light.

I do have 4 rectangles of fabric with paler centres and a darker frame, so it’s not entirely wasted. 

Adventures in Seeing: Welcome the Unexpected, Part Two

As I mentioned in my last post, sometimes the unexpected is very difficult to welcome. The header photograph is my record of some of the unexpected things we had to deal with last month. A fortnight on, things are beginning to settle down, and I’m trying to get back to something approaching normal – whatever the new normal is.  

Creativity is still limited: I’ve found sticking to established routines helps. Creative Sprint, which has been my life saver, has finished, but I’m trying to keep the impetus going by resuming 365 – Make Something Every Day.


I’ve concentrated on filling in the gaps where I missed days out before, and using familiar techniques because I don’t have the emotional energy to try anything too new. I do like the blue feather, though.


The Year of Stitches is making slow progress, but this one has reached the stage where I’m thinking ‘I quite like this’ which motivates me to finish it, so I speed up. I’m planning an outbreak of flowers in the centre, spilling over the lines.


I’m still knitting samples from Nicky Epstein’s ‘Knitting in Circles’, but I have also made an SKO. 

This is a particularly strange ‘strange knitted object’ because the wool (Airedale Wool’s ‘Lustre’, which is otherwise lovely), biased – hence the slanting embroidery and the off balance shape. I don’t usually block SKO’s, but I’m thinking of experimenting with stuffing them with plastic bags to try to even out some of the lumps and bumps. 

When I sat down to write this I thought it was going to be short, because I hadn’t done much – but there ‘s more than I thought. So even if no-one’s reading this, I’ve cheered myself up a bit, which has to be good.